A Jeremiah Spirit

Anyone who speaks in a tongue edifies themselves, but the one who prophesies edifies the church. I would like every one of you to speak in tongues, but I would rather have you prophesy. 1 Cor 14: 4—5 

The world is in dire need of prophets, people who will speak on behalf of the Lord, people who are willing to speak what the Lord puts on their hearts the words he puts on their tongues. The sad thing is, the world is full of prophets, at least it would be if the church truly stepped up and assumed its role as the Ambassadors of Christ we are called to be, if we all embraced and developed the prophetic gifting that is available to all believers, if we would just seek it and believe that we have it.

So the big question is; are you brave enough to pray for a Jeremiah spirit? Are you willing to accept the prophetic role even if it makes you uncomfortable or unpopular? You may have already noticed that seriously following Jesus will take you there anyway, so you might as well embrace it. 

Jeremiah was a prophet in ancient Israel, at least what was left of Israel at the time— Judah. The northern kingdom known as Israel had already fallen to the Assyrians years earlier. Jeremiah was in the southern kingdom of Judah at a time when it was very difficult to be a prophet. Actually anytime was a tough time to be a prophet in Israel, no one liked the prophets when they were around. Prophets are the ones who have the unenviable task of trying to get through to people with a message from the Lord that they usually don’t want to hear.

In Jeremiah’s case he was sent to warn the leaders of Judah that if they didn’t change their ways and turn back to the Lord real soon they were done for. Time was running out, in fact they were out of warnings, they were being told— You’re done.’

Jeremiah was charged with preparing them for their coming judgement and captivity while promising their eventual return to the promised land.  

But the people refused to listen to Jeremiah. There were too many false prophets running around assuring people that they could not fall because they were God’s people. Never mind the fact that they didn’t act like God’s people and had chased after every other god that they could find and every man did what was right in his own eyes— they lived to please the flesh. Not unlike today. . .

But Jeremiah is faithful to keep warning them even though they refuse to hear. And the false prophets of sunshine and roses continued to lull God’s people to sleep.

They have lied about the Lord,
And said, “It is not He.
Neither will evil come upon us,
Nor shall we see sword or famine.
13 And the prophets become wind,
For the word is not in them.
Thus shall it be done to them.”

14 Therefore thus says the Lord God of hosts:

“Because you speak this word,
Behold, I will make My words in your mouth fire,
And this people wood,
And it shall devour them

Jeremiah 5:12-14

Jeremiah had a hard row to hoe in his day. But God had a much bigger purpose for him that has continued to encourage and strengthen the people of God to this day. He has certainly influenced me and encouraged me. May my words burn with the fire that Jeremiah’s did for the purpose of exposing the wiles of the enemy and consuming his lies.

Hard time to pastor

This is a hard time to be a pastor. I’m sure pastoring has never been easy but in recent generations, at least in America we— not just pastors but Christians in general— have had it relatively easy as much of the country and our leadership still had a moral compass based on the word of God, the principles espoused by the Lord and the prophets and there was a healthy respect for the Lord and his shepherds. And no one would have imagined arresting a pastor for refusing to shut the doors of his church to Sunday worship.

Perhaps the times we are in seem all the more troubling because we have experienced and remember a time when our culture and our government wasn’t set against us, when being a follower of Jesus and an adherent to the word of God didn’t get you labeled as a hater, a closed minded homophobe, racist, or just plain ignorant. The enemy has  been slinging all kinds of mud at the church lately and he has gotten a lot of it to stick.

That’s what makes it hard to be a pastor— it’s defending and being responsible for equipping you to stand up under the onslaught, that becomes such a burden. How to not live in fear and kowtow to every whim of the enemy.

It would be so much easier to just teach you the beatitudes, tell you all how wonderful you are, how wonderful God is and to go out and have a wonderful life. But, as I have said before the time for fluff is long gone. Spirit led teachers are having to set aside more and more the bumper sticker, song lyric, platitudes and the time tested teaching models as the Lord is stepping up his prophetic outpourings as his people need to be warned and prepared for the evil days to come, and that have already come.

More importantly God is speaking to and through his leaders, those who will listen, to not just prepare the people but to try and avert the judgement to come. In plain English— It’s hard to be a Pastor right now because God wants to use me, he wants to use any Pastor or believer who will obey, to convey the hard message that all is not well. It is no fun to have to warn people against evil when it has become so prevalent that we have reached a tipping point to where, short of a miracle in the form of  great awakening to the Lord, we are finished as a nation, a people and perhaps a world.

Don’t be afraid to speak out what the Lord puts on your heart. You may be saving someone else’s soul; you may be saving our very nation.

The Freedom of Trust

Real freedom comes from a heart of trust, we earn God’s trust by trusting in him. And that is a whole other level of freedom.

The Old Testament prophet Jeremiah had without question, a tough job. He was tasked with warning the Kingdom of Judah of imminent judgement unless they repented and turned back to the God of their Fathers, Yahweh. Long story short, they did not listen and Jeremiah found himself imprisoned by his fellow Jews while Jerusalem found themselves besieged by Babylon. The overthrow of the city was upon them and Jeremiah’s condition could only go from bad to wore on the day the city fell, or so he thought.

I will rescue you on that day… because you trust in me,  declares the Lord. Jer 39:18

The Lord keeps his promise to Jeremiah and he is later released from a Babylonian concentration camp on the orders of Nebuchadnezzar himself, after a short time in captivity. He is set free with an invitation by the captain of the guard to go anywhere he wants, “See, you have the whole country before you.” He even gets an invitation to live in Babylon as an honored and well appointed guest of this same captain. He choses to stay in Judah and minister to his own beleaguered people.

But that is his choice. Something he had not experienced for quite some time-the freedom to choose, within God’s plan for him.

This is a freedom that is hard to teach because it really has to be experienced, it is a spiritual state, not a physical one. A freedom that comes from grace, and, as a result of claiming it for ourselves— claiming it and defending it. Because others will not want us to keep it.

The freedom to follow our heart’s desires from a heart that has become one with our Lord, a heart set free from the impurities that would pervert and cloud our judgment.

Not Puppets

That freedom from God is a far cry from religion, but it’s also a far cry from the notion many Spirit filled Christians have that their every move has to be directly guided by the Spirit like they are just a marionette on a set of strings. God never wanted puppets, and he still doesn’t. He guides us and often needs to adjust our course as we still have to struggle to keep the flesh at bay. But more often, in the life of the believer, he trusts us and allows us to make our own decisions.

I know a lot of Christians who struggle with this notion, they don’t believe they have a choice. That everything they do has to be out of obedience to a direct command from God, or from someone representing God.

Do you believe in the freedom to choose, the freedom in Christ, to choose? Jeremiah got to a place where God trusted him, God trusted him to make his own choices knowing that Jeremiah would make a wise choice because Jeremiah knew the heart of his God, he now had that same heart.

God doesn’t just invite us to follow him, he invites us to walk with him. At first that sounds like a very insignificant difference. And it may be one that occurs over time in the life of a believer. And in reality, it was the difference between the Prophets of old, and those like Peter who knew the Lord.

 If, as in the case of Jeremiah here, we have been faithful to follow the Lord, to seek his will and obey his voice, eventually, especially now that the Holy Spirit is available to dwell within us and radically change the way we see the world, we will get to the point where we can know the heart of the Lord, where we can be his hands and feet, literally walk beside him keeping step because we know his heart—we share his heart.

The freedom of trust

Real freedom comes from a heart of trust. When we get to the place where we truly trust the Lord, our hearts are free, free from fear, from hopelessness, from worry- so many things, because we know we are cared for, we know that no matter what happens, it’s going to be all right in the end.

At this point we are truly free. At this point we are not only trusting God, God is trusting us. This is a good place to be. It is not easy to get there, but if we are faithful, if we continue to hold on to hope, believing the promises, you will get there, God wants you there. He wants to call you a friend -not a servant. He wants to truly set you free.

Freedom is the basis of our entire being and relationship to God. When we trust Jesus for our salvation we are freed from many things, primarily we are freed from the penalty of sin. We are free from the fear of death, born into new life, life that cannot end because it is a gift from the author of life. Then we are offered freedom from the things we have been forgiven for, freed from the power of sin to ensnare us.

We are freed to fulfill the plan that God has for our lives- a promise God gives us in part through the prophet Jeremiah himself—the famous Jeremiah 29:11 promise. “For I know the plans I have for you declares the Lord. . . “

We are freed from the curse, from the law, from fear, condemnation, and we can be freed from sickness and addictions, despair and anxiety- if we truly trust the Lord, not just for our salvation, but as our Lord, as one who truly loves and cares about us, who seeks only our good.

When we get to that place where we truly trust the Lord, not only are we able to truly live free, but we are now trusted by the Lord.

But you know what? Most Christians fear that freedom. They don’t want to be free, they don’t want to have choices, they don’t want the whole country before them to go anywhere they choose- they want to be told where to go. They want the spiritual equivalent of the magic eight ball. Throw out the brains and the wisdom and just shake the ball and watch for the answer in the little window.

“Lord, show me your will, what is your plan for me?- give me a sign!” I cannot tell you how many people I know who agonize over this, who are rendered almost useless and immobile because they are afraid to move within the freedom they are offered.

So what happens? They find themselves back in chains, chains of fear, chains of submission to another’s calling, another’s agenda, or chains of a feeling of unworthiness. All of these can be crippling.

Yes the Spirit will guide you, yes he will put people in your life to help guide you as well, but sometimes he gives you a choice- trusting your heart, that you will make a good choice.

Here’s a thought; maybe, just maybe, the things on your heart are planted there by God, maybe your hopes and dreams did come from him— maybe it’s okay to trust a heart that is filled with the Holy Spirit! Maybe you can make wise choices.

There’s also this little thing called character. We know God is concerned with our character. Why would he be so concerned with our character, the kind of person we are, spending so much time teaching us, orchestrating our lives to build our character, if he wasn’t going to allow us to live our lives based on the paths we chose out of a character honed and strengthened by him?

 We have to always be seeking the Lord, but never frozen immobilebecause we are afraid to move, we have to trust that God will guide the paths of the righteous.

He restores my soul; He leads me in the paths of righteousness For His name’s sake. Psalm 22:3

The Chosen People

Hard Lessons Learned

After a crazy vision of a sheet being let down from heaven full of “unclean” animals with a command from God to eat, the apostle Peter is led to go to the house of a Roman centurion, to share the gospel. Normally, being a good Jewish boy, Peter would have flat out refused, but the sheet thing has him expanding his horizons a bit. He goes, the Holy Spirit falls on the whole house full of Romans and they all start speaking in tongues and praising God, leaving Peter to proclaim; Acts chapter 10-

Then Peter opened his mouth and said: “In truth I perceive that God shows no partiality.  But in every nation whoever fears Him and works righteousness is accepted by Him. The word which God sent to the children of Israel, preaching peace through Jesus Christ—He is Lord of all—Acts 10:34-36

Jesus is Lord of all.

We have see over and over again throughout the gospels and through much of Acts—example after example of Jesus wanting this message of the Father’s love, and the Spirit’s desire to heal and deliver, being for all persons regardless of nationality, gender or status. Jesus’ last words before he ascended back to heaven were that the Apostles were to go and make disciples of all nations.

We have seen the early church scattered and the message being brought to other nations and peoples by the persecuted church such as to the Samaritans and the Ethiopians. We have seen Paul being appointed by the Lord as a chosen vessel to carry the gospel to the gentiles.

Yet for all this, in the first years of the church there is still a deep seated and unshakable bigotry on the part of the Jewish believers, particularly on the ones who should know better, the Apostles.

They just can’t get over this notion that has been taught them since childhood, not just them, but countless generations of Israelites, that they are chosen by God, at the exclusion of all others, by virtue of their linage as descendants of Abraham to whom the promise was first made, that they would be a chosen people through whom many nations would be blessed. And that they are not to mingle, to be intermarried, have fellowship with or eat with anyone who does not worship the Lord their God lest they become unclean.

This notion originates in the law and the prophets. But it was meant to protect and preserve them from their own weaknesses, not from other people. And it was never meant to engender a hatred for anyone. The prophet Jonah learned that when he refused to go to the hated Ninevites with a message of warning and opportunity for the Assyrians, and ended up in the belly of the great fish thinking about how, apparently to God, all lives matter—even Assyrian.

Photo by Elianne Dipp on Pexels.com

Although Jonah finally went and preached to the Assyrians in their capital city of Nineveh, in the end, the Assyrians would become a larger influence on Israel than Israel ever was on Assyria, because Assyria was more than happy to share their gods with Israel. And, as a result, God would use Assyria to mete out his Judgement on Israel for their adulteries.

He would later do the same to Judah with Babylon.

But, instead of learning the importance of being a light to the Gentiles, they doubled down on separating themselves once they were allowed to return from exile. They were the chosen people and no one else in the world had any right to oppress them or had a share in their inheritance.

Isolationists

So now, in Peter’s day, this notion of superiority and separation has been taken to the extreme by the post exilic Jews who are determined to not get led astray again by foreign Gods and carried off once again by foreigners as punishment for their unfaithfulness.

Sounds like a good policy, but they have taken it to the extreme at the urging of their rabbi’s, priests and pharisees who see total isolation from all things non Jewish as the equivalent of holiness. When in reality this isolationist theology is preventing them from being the light to the world God had always intended for them to be.

And it was preventing them from thinking they had any personal responsibility in it all—they were children of Abraham, what else do you need to know? Even Jesus had pointed out the problem with this notion on more than one occasion. Yes they were chosen and set apart, but not because they were somehow a superior race that would just skate into God’s graces by virtue of their heritage.

It was God keeping a promise to Abraham, and being determined to bless the world as a result.

I will give to your descendants all these lands; and in your seed all the nations of the earth shall be blessed; because Abraham obeyed My voice and kept My charge, My commandments, My statutes, and My laws.” Gen 26:3-5

God had chosen Israel as a people set apart as keepers of his covenant and his word. Not so that no one else would have access to it, but so that it would be preserved and passed down for all to know.

And we will forever owe a debt of gratitude to the chosen people, the descendants of Abraham, for preserving that word for us. And, for ultimately fulfilling the promises given through them that all would be blessed and that we would see a great light to lead us from the darkness, in that our Savior, the Messiah, came to us from the lineage of David, a descendant of Abraham.

And that even that message, the gospel of Jesus Christ, was shared, written and preserved for all the world by the Jewish—very Jewish— Apostles of Jesus of Nazareth.

Continue to pray that more and more of the Jewish people will come to the Messiah for salvation and for the peace of Israel.

And let the God of Abraham, fill you, let him open your eyes, let him set you free—free at last. Through His son and by His Spirit. Amen

Abomination That Causes Desolation

‘But the temple is no more—how can this be?

End times prophecy is tricky business with dual and even triple fulfillments, apocryphal symbolism and out of the blue proclamations and narratives that morph from historical records, to warnings of impending calamities, into oracles of events that we cannot ever fathom or foresee until they happen.

But in every case, as history has proven out, when they do happen, it is always starkly obvious for those who are watching. And it is always awe and faith inspiring.

Chapter 13 of Mark is full of fantastic prophetic warnings, and it all ends with this admonition from Jesus:

32 “But of that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father. 33 Take heed, watch and pray; for you do not know when the time is. 34 It is like a man going to a far country, who left his house and gave authority to his servants, and to each his work, and commanded the doorkeeper to watch35 Watch therefore, for you do not know when the master of the house is coming—in the evening, at midnight, at the crowing of the rooster, or in the morning— 36 lest, coming suddenly, he find you sleeping. 37 And what I say to you, I say to all: Watch!Mark 13

It seems like Jesus is trying to tell us something—oh, I know, watch!

It would appear that one of those significant events to be on watch for would be the horrific desecration of the temple.

The “abomination of desolation.” Jesus is quoting Daniel here from centuries earlier; words that were initially fulfilled by the Greeks back in 168 BC when Antiochus Epiphanies set up an altar for Zeus on top of the Lord’s altar and sacrificed a pig in the Temple.

The fact that Jesus is repeating this prophecy in answer to the question as to when the temple will be destroyed, again, couched in a warning to flee when it happens, would indicate that it has not been completely fulfilled. And, indeed later, the Romans would desecrate the temple just before they would go on an all-out campaign to destroy Israel and to wipe it’s memory from the map, literally, renaming it Palestine.

But most scholars believe, and it would seem to be the case in the context of the world ending prophecies to follow—like a burnt out sun and stars falling like fall leaves— and in light of other biblical warnings, that Jesus is also referring to a much later temple desecration to come.

This may well be describing apostacies that the Anti-Christ, or man of sin, as he’s referred to elsewhere will commit in the temple. Some believe he will set up the image of the beast in the temple—the beast he forces the world to worship in the last days of his reign of terror as described in Revelation.

Temple?

‘But the temple is no more—how can this be?’ Huh, just a generation or two ago they also said ‘Israel is no more—how can this be?‘ We serve a God of the impossible. The meaning of these prophecies is often debated on the grounds that the temple cannot be rebuilt. Excuse me but—that’s absurd.

Because of Jesus’ words here, also repeated verbatim in other gospel accounts, I have always looked for the temple to be desecrated as a precursor to the day of the Lordfor these prophecies to be literally fulfilled.

I’m just reading the prophecies. Like this maddeningly out of the blue tidbit in Thessalonians, offered by  Paul as a supplement to a verbal lesson he gave them earlier, of which there is no record. All we have is this:

This passage would seem to indicate that the literal temple would be intruded upon by a usurper who sets himself up as God and actually takes a seat in the temple. If that’s not an abomination, I don’t know what is. Now, there is disagreement as to who this is, if it had been fulfilled by the Roman invaders. Or, if it is future, is it referring to a rebuilt temple, or to our own hearts as we are now temple of the Holy Spirit?

There is no historical figure who completely fulfills this prophecy and the immediate and plainest understanding of these words would make one picture an actual stone and mortar temple— The temple.

Which means what? That the temple would need to be rebuilt before the return of Jesus for his elect. And this all seems to be an echo of Jesus’ own words in Mark.

Impossible?

A rebuilt temple is something that indeed seemed entirely impossible until 1947 when Israel returned to their land with the blessing of the United Nations and reclaimed Jerusalem as their capital, which finally got the blessing of the United States just three years ago under President Trump with the relocation of our embassy.

Don’t underestimate the significance of the most powerful nation on earth acknowledging Jerusalem as the capital city of the people of the covenant after two thousand years of exile. I can guarantee you the enemy is livid over this, as are all his servants.

“But there is a mosque sitting smack on top of the apparent temple site!” Yes, Captain Obvious, there is. But God has overcome much larger obstacles than that in preserving Israel as a people without a homeland for thousands of years, even in the face of varied and many attempts at genocide over the centuries. Restoring the land to them and then preserving them there, even though they are a tiny island in a sea of mortal enemies.

So don’t be so sure there is anything in the way. Watch, that is the point of today’s lesson—watch. The branches of the fig tree are getting tender. (Mark 13;28-30)

Keep an eye on Israel, keep and eye on your own heart and fight with all your might to preserve and restore truth and the freedom to live and proclaim it. Pray for the church, for the United States, and keep praying for Israel—for their protection and for them to recognize their Messiah—many have and are.

Israel is intrinsically intertwined and a major, the major, player in all of end times prophecies. How we relate to and support or neglect Israel will determine how we fare as a people in these final days as well. So, be watchful for all of that.

The enemy is not done trying to destroy Israel and his greatest and final attempt is yet to come.

Armageddon

Blessed is he who watches. . .” We must be vigilant, watchful for the tricks of the enemy, so that we are not deceived into unwittingly supporting him against Israel, and against us– the church.

The enemy has plans, plans that are laid out in great detail in the old and new testaments, to stop and destroy Israel. He needs to destroy Israel because he is well aware of their key role in the final redemption and judgements of this earth that spell his final doom. The final desecration of the rebuilt temple in Israel will start the final countdown to our Lord’s return to avenge and rescue his people.

But we already know his battle plans;

This is but a small snippet of the great details given of this final battle and the preparations for it found in scripture. But there is something in the way right now, preventing thisus.

It would seem that we, the United States, are the major obstacle to the plan of the enemy, by way of the Antichrist and his pet beast, to his being able to make war on and destroy Israel.

Which is why the enemy is hell bent on destroying us, at least as the God fearing, freedom loving country that we have been who sees Israel as being the rightful inhabitants of the promised land and the people of the covenant of which we are now benefactors.

This goes way beyond politics, we are in a battle for the soul and survival of this nation, the world. Jesus will not let his people, nor his creation, be destroyed, and he will put an end to it all before that happens—and then, it is all over. Then, the day of the Lord will come. And that final battle on the plains of Megiddo will not go quite like the enemy hoped.

Because, news flash—Our Lord was Jewish, and he plans on returning to the same land from whence he left.

Zechariah goes on the say that Israel will be saved by fleeing through the valley created by the Lord’s splitting of that mountain. And the carnage that befalls the enemies of Israel in that day is described in great detail as well. And it is not for the squeamish.

So, If this is the generation that will witness the final days and get to represent Jesus Christ even in the midst of the great tribulation, what an honor and a blessing to be counted among those chosen for such a time as this, for our eternal reward will be glorious and wonderful beyond comprehension.

Watch, stay diligent, stay on task, and keep the faith. That’s what Jesus wants us to really understand, that he has not forgotten nor forsaken us and we are on the cusp of the greatest adventure of all time.

Even so, come Lord Jesus–come.

17 The Spirit and the bride say, “Come.”
And let everyone who hears say, “Come.”
And let everyone who is thirsty come.
Let anyone who wishes take the water of life as a gift.

Rev 22:16—17

Really? Rahab the Harlot?

“…her words and her actions bore witness to a God given, front loaded, heart of faith.

In the second chapter of James we are given two examples of those who proved that their faith was real by their actions. Abraham and “Rahab the Harlot”.

Unarguably, Abraham’s actions as found in Genesis were a testament to his faith and a fitting seal of a long life of faithfulness and nearly everyone knows who he is still today.

But then, there is Rahab. She is just dropped into the picture out of the blue, a woman with no known history of faithfulness and no long recorded history of interactions with God for us to marvel at. Yet she ends up with a lead role in the story of the making of Israel.

Rahab

You have to wonder, of all the people in the Hebrew scriptures— Noah, Jacob, Moses, Joshua, King David, Elijah, Ruth, Solomon, Jeremiah, Esther—great heroes, prophets and examples of integrity and tenacity—of all the possible examples, to put on par with Abraham as examples of those justified by faith in action, James uses Rahab the harlot.

Really? Rahab the harlot?

Obviously her last name wasn’t harlot but that was her designation, a title actually. Like Builder Bob or Sam the butcher. James makes it clear in that way just to whom he is referring, there is no mistaking—but still, Rahab the Harlot?

You all know that means she’s a prostitute right? Not exactly a career choice that a woman who wants to become a beacon of light and an example of faith in the Kingdom of God, should draw to—let alone even go and stay with, as the spies that Joshua sent to her hometown of Jericho to check out did. Really guys, you went straight to a prostitutes house to find sanctuary?  

I just love the realness and grittiness of the bible. God uses real people to do his greatest works, and he doesn’t gloss over their flaws. It gives me hope.

So, why Rahab? Why would God lead the spies there and why would James use her to make his point?

Easy—She was able to show them the money. She probably didn’t talk a lot of bible speak or come across as a religious person, she was, after all, a harlot in a pagan city. But when it came down to it, she was able to show the fruits of her faith in the one true God by her actions.

In that regard I think James was quite ingenious in using her as an example of what he is telling us here when he says that we are to show our faith by our works. There was nothing else about her,at least not that we are aware of, that would have merited her a place in the family of God, as a recipient of what was apparently a saving faith totally apart from the law and any religious expression in regard to Yahweh.

There is nothing about her, no moral witnesses, no history of her talking the right talk, saying the right words, praying the right prayers, no self-proclaimed rights to righteousness, seemingly nothing to merit her becoming listed as an ancestor to King David and thus to the Messiah, Jesus himself—she was not even Jewish! Let alone a worshipper of their God.

Salmon begot Boaz by Rahab, Boaz begot Obed by Ruth, Obed begot Jesse, and Jesse begot David the king. Mat 1

But when called upon to fulfill her destiny, to become a key player in the fulfillment of God’s promise to his people that he would deliver them from slavery and give them the land of Canaan, she acted with a courage that would set her apart as someone who truly had a faith in the God whose mighty acts she had only heard about. She had a faith in this unknown God who had apparently been whispering to her heart— that he was indeed real and loved her.

How do I know that? How do I know that God had been whispering to her heart? Because God does it all the time, and he has done it to me. And because her words and her actions bore witness to that God given, front loaded heart of faith.

Spies

Do you all know the story? From the book of Joshua?

The children of Israel had been miraculously delivered from slavery in Egypt, crossed the Red Sea, lived in the desert for forty years eating manna from heaven and were now finally ready to enter in and take the promised land under the leadership of Joshua.

But first, they have to get past Jericho. The fortress city that dominates the first region of the country the Lord is giving them as their new homeland, the very land he had promised hundreds of years earlier to Abraham, where he would become a great nation.

So Joshua, as any good military leader would, sends of a couple of spies to do some reconnaissance.  The spies make it into the city of Jericho largely unnoticed but word soon gets around that they are not just ordinary nomads coming to trade goat milk for pottery.

They are part of that very large group of former slaves from Egypt known as the Hebrews who have just crossed the Jordan river and are wreaking havoc on anyone who tries to stop them, and many have. So the spies seek out a place to hide, preferably someone who can give them a little insight as well, and somehow or other, I have to wonder at the thinking that led them there, but they end up in the home of a local prostitute named Rahab.

But, it turns out, little goes unnoticed in this town and word gets back to the King himself that there are enemy spies staying at Rahab’s house on top of the wall. So he sends troops to arrest them. But Rahab gets word that they are on their way so she takes the Israelites up on her roof where she has flax laid out in the sun to cure, and hides them underneath it. When the king’s men show up she tells them that the spies have already left and that if they hurry they might be able to catch them, so off they go.

After a time Rahab has the spies come out from hiding and tells them that she can lower them over the wall from her window, as her house is on the massive wall that surrounds the city, with a rope so that no one will see them leave and that they can then go in a different direction, avoiding those who are pursuing them.

But first she wants a promise. She has helped them at great risk to herself. But she realized that they were on the winning side, because she believed in an unseen God, heard the stories of his power to deliver those who serve him, and she fears him more than she fears the soldiers banging on her door.

She believes that the Israelites will indeed take the city she dwells in and that all their enemies will be destroyed. So she asks them to remember how she helped them and to spare her and her family when they return to take the city.

The spies tell her to tie a scarlet cord in her window as a sign and a reminder to the Israelite army that they are to spare her and all in her house. And indeed that is what happens. When the Israelites return and do their now famous seven day march around the city walls and blow them to smithereens with nothing but a shout and a trumpet blast, Rahab and her family are spared and become a part of the nation of Israel.

Now, thinking about this story, it seems that her part in the big picture conquest of the promised land was pretty small. I mean, Jericho probably would have been taken regardless of the spies eluding capture, but that is not the point.

The point of the story, the point of God’s favor and blessing on Rahab, and the point that James is making, is that it is not the significance or standing in man’s eyes, it is not the outward appearance or having a clean record of holiness and purity—it’s what are you doing today, it’s who are you when the chips are down, how do you respond when your hour comes and God is giving you an opportunity for action, calling you to fulfill your purpose, to make a real difference, to bless and help someone in a real tangible way.

Rahab literally saved the lives of two men and endangered her and her family in the process; two men she had never met before from a strange people she had only heard horror stories about—the Hebrew refugees from Egypt who are mowing down everyone who gets in their way. But, they have this God. . .

And what this God saw in Rahab the Harlot was a heart that wanted to do what was right, that said yes to him when it mattered the most, and when it was probably the hardest to say yes.

God said ‘show me the fruit Rahab’, and she did. And her faith saved her.

A faith lived out is a faith lived in. A faith walked out is a faith that will carry you home.