Don’t Look Down

Lord! I’m afraid to take another step! Come and get me, my knees are wobbling and I’m getting vertigo!”

love overcomes crown

1 John 4:18— a verse that will no doubt be familiar to many of you, at least in part—says:

 18 There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves torment.

Fear does indeed involve torment, fear is torment. Often fear is what causes whatever it is you’re afraid of to come to pass. It becomes what we are focused on and it throws us off balance. Whatever you convince yourself is going to happen is often what happens. That’s why we need to learn to change our focus, to let perfect love become our guide, our focal point, leaving no room for fear.

Spoiler alert—that perfect love is Jesus.

The High Iron

As those of you who know me know, I work construction and have all my adult life in various forms. Whether moving dirt, welding, pounding nails or pouring concrete, I have always worked with my hands, and even though now I largely oversee that work as a project superintendent, I still like to get dirty and work with my tools when I can.

One of the things I don’t like is being way up in the air—unless I know I have something solid underneath of me or know that I have a safety harness on, which today is required by OSHA. When I started in this business safety was pretty lax and I was asked to do some pretty crazy dangerous stuff looking back—I think I kept my guardian angel on his toes, and even slipped thru his grasp a time or two, but I have survived—largely intact. (keyword being largely)

Still, you are not going to catch me walking any beams, harness or not, more than a couple of stories off the ground. I have jokingly said that one of the reasons I work in Montana is because we don’t have too many high rises.

My grandfather, on the other hand, was an iron worker who worked in big cities like Dallas and Minneapolis. He liked to walk the high iron, as they call it. I remember talking to him many years ago as he was recounting his work on a 60 story sky scraper in Minneapolis and he said he liked working up top because the foreman were afraid to go up there and everyone left you alone.

 

He told me something that has stuck with me throughout my whole construction career and although you are never going to catch me on an I beam 60 stories off the ground, it has come in handy many times as I have walked on top of a concrete foundation wall or the top of a framed wall, or even when stepping from stone to stone as I’m crossing a mountain creek for instance, and that is; “When you are walking the high iron, don’t look at your feet.”

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You have to have faith in your feet. You have to trust that your feet are going to go where your eyes go.

Think about it, when you are walking anywhere else you are not looking at your feet, your eyes are ten or twenty feet in front of you mapping out your path, and your feet just follow.

When you stare straight down at your feet you get nervous, you lose your balance, because your world just became very small and out of proportion, and the next thing you know you are tipping over. Not to mention if you are looking down at your feet you are focused on the dangers below them instead of where you are going.

But if you have faith in your feet and just keep walking to where you need to go next, you’ll get there just as surely as if you were strolling down the sidewalk on a sunny day.

eyes on Jesus

How are we doing? Are you keeping your eyes ahead, mindful of  where you are going, or are you worrying about whether or not you are going to lose control and fall to your death?

Walking the walls, hopping the stones, or walking the high iron, it’s all about what’s going on in your head, it’s having faith in your ability to keep putting one foot in front of the other and staying upright.

You do it anywhere else! Why would you suddenly just tip over because you are over a dangerous spot?

The same is true in life, we have to have faith in our ability to keep moving forward.

We trust Jesus to be with us and get us through our days when things are going well, when we are just strolling along, going where we have been a hundred times without any overriding fear of falling. But when things get challenging, when we look down and realize that we are walking in places we haven’t been before, when it seems that we could easily fall to our death if we make one wrong move; and we panic—”Lord! I’m afraid to take another step! Come and get me, my knees are wobbling and I’m getting vertigo!”

And he says, Child! Look up, keep your eyes on me and just keep walking, don’t look down and don’t look at your feet. I will lead you to where you need to go, but you must trust me, you must have faith in the feet I have given you for this day. I love you too much to let you fall for fear of moving—let my love overcome.

calm the storm

I Am –The Punch List?

“I don’t need to check with someone else, I have the authority.  As far as you’re concerned—I am the punch list.”

The Apostle John refers to Jesus as being The Word. So, how can Jesus be the Word? How can a person, a real tangible thing, be a subjective intangible thing?

the word become flesh

And, that seems like kind of a strange thing to call someone, Son of God or no. I’ve thought about and studied this a lot over the years but as I followed the Lord into the head of his apostle John here, I think I had a bit of a revelation, or at least a better understanding, of what that means.

It kind of goes back to something I’m sure John heard Jesus challenged on many times; By what authority are you doing or teaching these things?

It’s hard to explain something that I fear I am only catching fleeting glimpses of myself in its magnitude.

But–lucky for you–I have a story, that I know will fall woefully short of being anywhere near adequate to explain what this all means but it might help you start to wrap your brains around it.

Punch List

As many of you know, I am a Superintendent for a commercial building contractor which means I am responsible for getting things built, built right and on time.

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A few years ago I was overseeing the building of a 40,000 sq. ft. warehouse addition for a chemical plant. It was largely what they call a pre-engineered metal building. Which means it’s a whole lot of steel beams and sheet metal that all bolts and welds together. This involves a lot of very large heavy beams, columns, purlins and girders, but it also involves a lot of small braces, nuts, bolts and screws. All of which have to fit together and all of which are important to the overall integrity of the building.

What got me thinking about this was a video I saw the other day, a nightmare video for anyone who builds for a living, of a large steel building going up, suddenly crashing to the ground while they are working on it, and there are workers everywhere.

You could see the big steel columns were all in place and they were setting the main roof girders when the roof steel just started to buckle under its own weight and soon came crashing down and taking the whole building, and the cranes that were still attached to it, along with it. It looked like everyone had a chance to run clear before it all hit the ground, but what a mess.

(Similar to this one– another builder nightmare GIF)

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I thought; “Why would that have happened? It had to have been designed by an engineer to support the weight and then some?” Then it dawned on me. They were probably just setting all the big stuff, the main beams and columns while they had the cranes there—cranes are very expensive—without doing any cross bracing or supports—the little stuff that can be put on by hand off ladders and lifts later. Big mistake.

 

That’s when I remembered that huge metal building I had done in Billings, it was about three times bigger than the one in the video I saw— It didn’t fall over. But there was some corner cutting going on there, I discovered near the end.

As the Iron workers we had contracted to erect the building for us were telling me they were almost done, I started asking their foreman about all the left over parts we had and comparing what was built to the structural steel details of the plans.

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In particular we had pallets full of 3 or 4 foot long angle iron pieces. “Aren’t those the braces that go from the columns to the roof purlins?” I asked looking up at the 20 foot high ceiling with him. “Oh, yeah, I don’t think we need them, they’ll never notice. Let’s wait and see if they make the punch list.”

That was the wrong thing to say to me.

Now, for those of you who are not in construction, a punch list is a list that is generated at the end of a project when the contractors say they are done. It is a list of all the things that need fixed. The owner, architect, job superintendent and engineers who have authority to say what is acceptable or not, usually puts together this list of things that are not quite done, got missed or need repaired.

The list then goes out to all the different trades who worked on the project and they are responsible to either correct the item or plead their case as to why they believe it is acceptable as is. Either way, the job is not completed and no one gets paid until everything on that list is checked off.

And you know what? As the Superintendent overseeing a project for the General contractor who is responsible for making sure things get built on schedule and built right, I have the authority to put items on that list and in the end it is my responsibility to check items off of that list before submitting to the owner that it is done and getting his final stamp of acceptance.

So, I said to my little “No one will notice a few missing braces” iron worker buddy “I know that those missing braces will be on the punch list because I am going to put them there!” He just looked at me totally incredulous, but he stopped arguing with me at that point and guess what? He put on all the braces.

News flash, ‘I am not here to help you get by with doing a half-assed job, I am here to make sure it gets done right. And, not only will I put any of your unfinished or unacceptable work on the list, I will be the one who checks it off the list when it is complete.’

‘I don’t need to check with someone else, I have the authority.  As far as you’re concerned—I am the list.’

word with authority

Jesus is the final authority—in everything. ‘As far as your concerned’, he was telling all who challenged him, ‘I am the Word.’

John, who wrote in his gospel, his letters and in Revelation, that Jesus is the Word  got his theology from Jesus, from listening to him teach for three years, listening to him interact with others and then by having the promised counselor living in his heart reminding him of everything he heard, and teaching him all things. So when John refers to Jesus as the Word, he is encapsulating and distilling down what Jesus said and inferred over and over, that Jesus is the fulfillment, the author and the enforcer of God’s word.

Jesus was constantly being challenged by those who thought they knew the word better than he did. And they thought they could get away with what they were doing, that they could justify their way of thinking and acting, by the word, and even use it against him.

But time and again Jesus pointed out that He was the authority, the final say, the only and ultimate truth and the judge of what is right and wrong, finished and unfinished, acceptable and unacceptable. Judging by the word and saving by the word. He was the maker of the punch list, the one who saw that the punch list was carried out and the only one who can judge in the end as to whether or not the items called out were completed or whether they could be struck from the list as no longer being an outstanding issue.

Which of course is what he did on the cross.

Breach of contract

He fulfilled the contractual obligation and paid the penalty for failure to comply, thus releasing those whose names appeared behind those unfinished or substandard items from their obligation.

In short—either you fixed it or you put your hope in the one who could release you from it and thanked him for it.

Which is why the word had to come in the flesh, so he could pay the penalty for our breach of contract—so that we could be signed off as completed. “I am the author of the list, and only I can remove you from the list.” Until then you are not finished. That can be kind of scary—but then, come the words from the lips of the author of the list, the author of life, as he hung dying on the cross—“It is finished.”

It is finished Jesus

Perhaps the most beautiful and meaningful words the Word of Life ever uttered. None who heard it at the time knew what it meant, but now all those who believe and received, who abide in the doctrine of Christ—they rejoice in those words. Those words are life for us.

children of God recieve believe

Our striving is over, the condemnation that comes for failing to live up to and abide by the words of God spoken as prophecies, laws and historical lessons, is removed—we have been set free by that which all of that pointed to, and was intended to convey, confer and promote—Love.

Love for God, the Love of God, and our love for one another.Little children …Love.’

The doctrine of Christ is love— “For God so loved the world… Love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your souls and love your neighbor as yourself.  This is love, that while we were yet sinners Christ died for us. Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, … perfect love casts out fear, …above all of these put on love.”

I could do this all day—because God is love, his word is love, Jesus is the word and Jesus is love. All encompassing, sacrificial—”this is how much I love you ’Father forgive them for they know not what they do’—love.”

little children love 1 John

 

That is what the bible is about, that is what Jesus is about, and that’s what the writings of the disciple whom Jesus loved is about.

So, that needs to be what we are about.

 

You Old Guys!?

You can either have a person’s back and know they’ll have yours, or you can stab a person in the back and expect to be stabbed.

older men

Don’t be a grumpy old man. At 58, I’m starting to understand why some old men get grumpy—it gets wearisome sometimes when all the been there done that’s under your belt keep coming up against all the haven’t been there and haven’t done that yet—‘but let me tell you how it is’ —punks who want to have the same old fights with you that you’ve dealt with a hundred times.

Just imagine how God feels, the one who has always been there and knows all things, when we try to tell him how to fix things— how to answer our prayers. One thing I’ve figured out along the way is to always pray the Lord’s will be done, my prayers are suggestions, unless the Lord shows me specifically how he wants me to pray, and my faith is in the fact that God hears and knows how to handle my petitions, he doesn’t need me to give him a step by step fix it list.

That’s just an aside; the point of these instructions are to tell us older guys not to be grumpy old men.

Older men be sober, reverent, patient and loving. Sounds pretty basic. But how many are good at that? As one who is now falling into the “older men” category I become ever more mindful of how I relate to other guys because a lot of them are now younger then me. I had kind of a reality check a year or two ago on my construction job.

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I was getting on a plumber on my job one day about getting his under–slab rough-in done so we could pour the floor slab on schedule. He was a young guy with an even younger helper and struggling a bit to figure things out. So I, apparently not so patiently, explained a couple things to him; *“Let me explain the situation here, A. you’re getting me down. B we got us a leash law here and C. You’re in the wrong town.” (Okay, only you fellow baby boomers out there will get that one) and he looks at me and says: “You older guys need to be patient and help us out a bit, we don’t know everything yet.”

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I was kind of convicted by that—I try to be patient but job pressures sometimes make that tough—but what really struck me was that designation; “Old guys”. I didn’t think of myself as an old guy—the old guys are the old guys—wait, my old guys are dead or retired, I am the old guy!

I’ve tried to change my outlook a bit since then. Instead of getting frustrated at having to deal with the same things yet again and teach yet another green hand how to do things, I remember all the “old guys” I learned from and respected along the way and I want to be one of those guys. It takes on a whole larger and more critical aspect when you are also representing Jesus.

I did change my attitude toward that young plumber, made it a point to teach him a few things by helping he rather than riding him, and as the project progressed we ended up having some real good conversations about the Lord.

It’s hard to witness to someone whom you just belittled or got short with because they irritated you with their ignorance or lack of apparent motivation. You can be patient and respectful while still being firm in making sure the task at hand is being done to the best of everyone’s ability.

I learned a long time ago that a hand that respects you will do their best for you while someone whom you treat with disrespect will be looking for ways to get away with doing the minimum required and may even look for ways to make you look bad.

It’s about having one another’s backs. You can either have a person’s back and know they’ll have yours, or you can stab a person in the back and expect to be stabbed.

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Guy’s, don’t discount this. I have worked with some of the same guys for years, guys who don’t know the Lord and would much rather sleep off a hangover on Sunday morning than sit through a church service. But because I have earned their trust and respect they will actually listen to me when a door does open to interject my faith into a conversation and, even better, they will even ask the questions that start those conversations.

Many of them have asked me for my books and even read my blogs (I know right?). On the other hand, I have worked with guys who let everyone know right up front that they are religious, ‘I go to church, I teach Sunday school, I only listen to Christian radio…’ and they have a special way of looking down on the dirty heathens they are forced to work with. ‘I’m going to be late coming back from lunch because I have a noon Bible study.’

They have  the effect of driving people farther away from Jesus.

Then all the tax collectors and the sinners drew near to Him to hear Him. And the Pharisees and scribes complained, saying, “This Man receives sinners and eats with them.” Luke 15:1—2

In short, don’t be a pharisee—be Jesus to the world. Don’t shun sinners, eat with sinners, and exemplify a better way. The sinners drew near to Jesus. Are they drawing near to you? Or are they speaking evil about you behind your back?

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*CW McCall Crispy Critters

img_2941Barbarians in the Kingdom