The Mad Prophet

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“. . . clumsy, uncouth, crude, unsophisticated, redneck— that’s the words, those don’t bother me so much as the condescending looks and attitudes do. ‘

“The voice of one crying in the wilderness:
‘Prepare the way of the Lord;
Make His paths straight.’”

Now John himself was clothed in camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist; and his food was locusts and wild honey. Mat 3:3—4

I think we can learn a thing or two from John the Baptist that is relevant to where we are as a church family today. Just as John the Baptist prepared the way for Jesus, prepared hearts for the message of Jesus and the subsequent outpouring in his day, the last days will need harbingers as well—they could very well be alive today, they could even be you.

Chew on that for a minute. —If you are mentoring or teaching, encouraging or equipping someone, you may very well be preparing the next John the Baptist, or you are the next John the Baptist. Don’t discount that idea or think it could never be someone like you.

11 “I baptize you with water for repentance. But after me comes one who is more powerful than I, whose sandals I am not worthy to carry. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. Mat 3:11

“I am not worthy”  Biblical prophets never considered themselves worthy, they were seldom well known until they went mad in the eyes of the world, and most often those who thought themselves superior to them didn’t take them seriously and told them to back off.

We cannot make either of those mistakes, we cannot discount others and we cannot discount ourselves—in fact, we are all called to prophesy.

I would like every one of you to speak in tongues, but I would rather have you prophesy. 1 Cor 14:5

It’s what your prophetic role is that becomes the question and whether or not you are bold enough to fulfill it.

The Lord likes to call those who, to the rest of the world, seem the least likely to fulfill the role he has in mind for them. It’s like God looks through High School yearbooks to find those voted least likely to succeed and chooses them. It might not be officially written in our year books but we all get labeled, classified, nonetheless. No matter our station in life at any given time we always seem to be either running from or trying to live up to a label.

I only recently embraced and became proud of what I call my barbarian side but it is something that has followed me all my life. Since I was a kid I have been labeled at various times as clumsy, uncouth, crude, unsophisticated, redneck— that’s the words, those don’t bother me so much as the condescending looks and attitudes do. We are all very adept at pegging people and being pegged, often times without a word and it is always very evident.

welder

Construction worker

I have worked with my hands all my life and never saw a lot of benefit to just putting in time in a classroom if they are not teaching something relevant or new.

Because of that I quit school at the start of my junior year to go into Job Corp to learn a trade that would make me a living. I had always done well in school but by the start of the 11th year it seemed like we just kept relearning the same stuff so I decided to stop wasting my time trying to stay awake in a classroom and do something more constructive. So before my classmates got that piece of paper and a tassel to hang on their car mirror for sticking it out I had gotten a GED, completed a heavy equipment operating course with over a thousand hours of operating time and was certified in three different types of welding.

While my former High school classmates were either going to work for minimum wage or going into debt to fund a college education they would spend much of their lives trying to repay, I was running back hoes, bulldozers and cranes and welding on pipeline jobs making decent money. But in most of the world’s eyes I was, and am, an uneducated construction worker.

Those of you who get dirty for a living know what I am talking about. There is often a little bit of an air of superiority in the way those who wear suits and ties to work relate to you—if they even bother to try. People assume you work with your hands because you are too stupid to do anything else.

This stigma carries into the church also. It’s not overt, but it is there. This is relevant because it is often a factor in who we choose to invest in as leaders. Surely the educated sharp dressed handsome man or the tastefully dressed young woman from the upstanding church family with no tats or piercings is the best candidate for the salaried position of her dreams in the big church.

I’m just saying, we need to stop looking at people like we are choosing the next cover model for GQ or Vanity Fair, we need to stop judging people by whether or not they have grease under their fingernails or letters after their names. And that goes both ways. Not all suits are snobs, many wish they had my job and my skills, they ae going insane sitting behind a desk all day.

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We cannot judge a person by outward appearances and the church establishment is probably the biggest offender. It goes all the way back to King David, and King Saul. Saul won the people’s choice award and David wasn’t even invited to the party, yet David became the king whose throne would endure forever.

And for you, don’t ever think you have to somehow look or act a part to win that part in the Kingdom of God. If you are called to be the preacher, the teacher, the evangelist, the prophet, the harbinger of the coming of the glory of the Lord—then don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Forge on my barbarian friends.

BAR COVER

Barbarians in the Kingdom

 

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Equal and Respected

“There is no room for the subjugation or devaluing of anyone in God’s

Kingdom. . . “

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The following is an excerpt from my newly released book; Barbarians in the Kingdom

I C O N T E N D T H A T Barbarism is a state of mind, one

the kingdom needs—as long as it is a state of mind that is subject to

Christ. As we saw earlier, the name barbarian was originally a term

used to designate a group of people: those unconquered and uncivilized

tribes living north of the mighty Roman empire. In later centuries those

now “civilized” barbarians would reassign this term to reference the

Norsemen who would pour out of the north, taking what they wanted

and answering to no one. We now know them as Vikings. The sword

and the battle ax was their law—at least in regard to the world outside

of their own communities.

Within their villages and clans they did live by a code of conduct, a

strict and honorable code of conduct that honored and protected women

and children and ensured that all could live in security and that they

each had a voice. Within this codified culture, as in nearly all barbarian

cultures, the women had an equal voice and were respected. Many of

them fought alongside the men in battle and some even led men in

battle; hence the venerated shield maidens—a misnomer, as according

to the Norse sagas they did much more than hold shields and bat their

eyes; they led warriors from the front.

The lower class?

It’s really a notion that comes along with civilization, advanced learning,

and religious regulations, that the women should be subjugated and

diminished to a lower class of citizen. We saw that in ancient Israel—a

very patriarchal culture—and in our own country’s not-so-ancient

history. Until just a few generations ago, women couldn’t even vote, and

if they chose to work outside of the house their options were few as they

were relegated to being nurses, teachers, waitresses, or secretaries. We

now see that religious expression of female subjugation to the extreme

in much of Islam where, under Sharia law, women are little more than

livestock.

God has an answer to that: “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there

is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all

one in Christ Jesus” (Gal. 3:28 NKJV).

Paul reiterates this to the Colossians: “ . . . and have put on the

new man who is renewed in knowledge according to the image of Him

who created him, where there is neither Greek nor Jew, circumcised nor

uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave nor free, but Christ is all and

in all” (Col. 3:10–11 NKJV).

There is no room for the subjugation or devaluing of anyone in God’s

kingdom, and again we see the barbarian put on an equal footing with

the “oh so philosophical” Greek and the spiritual and meticulously pious

Jew. Everyone—man, woman, slave, and free—is equal in the kingdom

of God among those who put their hope in Christ. So again I ask the question.

Why do we strive to emulate the “Greek” and the “Jew”—the

sophisticated and the religious?—“Let’s debate and argue theology until

we don’t even remember what the debate is about anymore, and let’s

see how many more rules and rituals we can cram into our written, and

unwritten, personal books of do’s and don’ts until we get so caught up

in the doing, so hung up in the nuances of our theological bents, that

we forget what the purpose of it all was in the first place.”— that we

can no longer see the forest for the trees.

According to this scripture, there is no advantage to being one over

the other, for our identity is now in Christ. The woman should not strive

and desire to be like the man. The Greek should not try to become the

Jew; the barbarian should not try to emulate—to try to act like someone

they are not—as though we must fit into a certain mold; “I must be

sophisticated and highly educated like the Greek. I have to be a shining

example of religious perfection like the God-fearing Jew—always seeking.” barbarian-meme

The point is, be who you are! That’s what this is saying.

If you are of the barbarian persuasion—then be the barbarian! That

is the simplicity of purpose. You cannot spend your life trying to be

someone you are not. If you commit yourself to Christ as a barbarian

and he welcomes you into his arms of love, then be the best barbarian

for Christ that you can be. He loved and called you for who you are. It’s

hard enough to keep the flesh at bay and try to keep the Spirit prevalent

in our hearts—we don’t need to make it all but impossible by trying to

be someone we are not. Playing yourself in the drama of life is much

simpler than playing someone else—someone you wish you were, or

were told you must be.

BAR COVER

Buy now at Amazon.com